P Shaped Victorian

Whether you want to enjoy your garden all the year round, or you are looking for more living space without the problems associated with moving house, a conservatory is an ideal way of achieving it. An increasing number of people now have conservatories attached to their homes and if you ever decide to put your property on the market, it is likely to sell much quicker with a conservatory than without one. You need to consider how much space you have available, how much money you want to spend, and what type of conservatory you are looking for. Some conservatory styles are better suited to small gardens while others are intended for properties with more space available.

If you have plenty of outdoor space and you are looking for a larger conservatory then the P shaped Victorian conservatory may be the ideal choice for your needs. The P shaped conservatory actually combines two styles to make one conservatory. The traditional Victorian style building is makes it easier to get the P shape, you can choose to have this conservatory with a three facet bay window or a five facet one. The larger size of the P shaped conservatory is large enough for one big living space or it can be separated into two rooms.

There are three build styles for the P shaped Victorian conservatory, glazed with brickwork dwarf walls, glazed with raised panels or fully glazed. If you are having a UPVC conservatory, providing you don’t live in a conservation area where you would need wood, you have a choice of colour finishes, white, classic oak or mahogany. You can also choose a manual or electric powered roof venting system. It is usual to have French or patio doors with this type of conservatory but you can have a single door if that is what you prefer.

There is a choice of floorings and conservatory blinds available for your P shaped Victorian conservatory. Flooring can be hard wearing terracotta tiles or solid wood flooring, both of which will not warp or rot. Many people prefer solid wood flooring because it adds more warmth to a building. Conservatory blinds are specially designed to reduce the glare of the sun and to make the conservatory a cooler place on hot summer days.

Crime is on the increase in many areas and for this reason the Association of Chief Police Officers launched a crime prevention project known as Secured by Design. The purpose behind the project is to increase the security of windows and doors and make them less susceptible to house breakers. Companies that have the ACPO Secured by Design seal use what is known as the Veka profile in their installations, which makes them more secure and increases the life of the installation. Secured by Design provides the home owner with added safety while at the same time increasing a building’s lifespan and reducing maintenance costs that arise from criminal damage.

P Shaped Victorian Hip

For those people who enjoy keeping up with the neighbours, a conservatory is a must have. Whether you need extra room for entertaining or you work from home and need extra space for an office, the conservatory is the ideal answer to your problems. Modern conservatories can be used as dining rooms, offices, garden rooms and even spare bedrooms. Conservatories come in a variety of shapes, styles and sizes depending on your needs and the space you have available. You should make sure that you have sufficient space and don’t need planning permission before you set about purchasing a conservatory as it is a major expense, but will eventually add value to your property.

If you live in a bungalow and have plenty of outdoor space in your garden then the Pshaped Victorian hip conservatory is an ideal choice. The P shape of the building gives you much more living space that can be used as one room or two separate rooms while the hipped roof and box gutter make it much more appropriate for a low rise or limited height building.

The P shape may have a three or five faceted bay front, depending on your preferences. You can choose to have a brick dwarf wall with glazing, raised panels and glazing, or all glazed. If you choose to have a raised panel and glazed conservatory then you have a choice of roof finishing, poly carbonate, glass and self cleaning glass. Modern UPVC conservatories do not have to be plain white; you can choose either mahogany or classic oak as alternatives to the ubiquitous white.

Conservatories need air, which means you will need to have vents in the roof and it is up to you whether these are manually or electrically operated. It is a good idea to be sure what your choices are and what you actually want before you start working your way around conservatory companies. While French doors are often a popular choice, especially for larger conservatories you can choose to have either patio doors or a single door. You will need to think about the type of flooring that you have in your conservatory there is an increasing move away from laminates to solid wood flooring. Ethically sourced timbers from sustainable forests can provide you with a conservatory floor that is rot and warp resistant and will last you for years.

The amount of glazing, particularly in a P shaped Victorian hip conservatory means that you really should invest in conservatory blinds to either the roof or the panels. Conservatory blinds convert the harsh glare of the sun into a much softer light and prevent the conservatory from becoming overheated on a hot summer’s day. There is a wide choice of conservatory blinds and modern Solar R is just one. Conservatory blinds reduce the harm that the sun’s UV rays can do, particularly when it comes to fading your carefully chosen conservatory furniture.

Victorian Five Sided

For those people with more outdoor space a Victorian five sided conservatory is a wonderful addition to any home. The idea of the Victorian conservatory was developed from the original orangeries of the late seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries, which were used to cultivate tropical plants and seeds. The Victorian conservatory is distinguished by its multi-faceted look, which allows plenty of light inside.

There are several build options for the Victorian five sided conservatory, from floor to ceiling glazing to raised panels and glass to brickwork in the form of a dwarf wall beneath the glazing. You will need to decide whether you want electrically or manually operated roof vents and also what type of door your want on the building. You can choose between a single door, patio doors or French doors. With the dwarf wall or fully glazed build type you can choose whether you have doors centrally situated or placed to the right or to the left.

If you intend spending a lot of time in your conservatory then you may find tiling a bit hard on the feet. An increasing number of conservatory owners are opting for solid wood floors because they give a greater sense of warmth and comfort, essential if you intend to spend a lot of time in your conservatory. Solid wood floors are hardwearing and will not warp or rot, so your floor should last for years.

On a hot summer’s day you may want to cool down the atmosphere in your Victorian five sided conservatory and specially made conservatory blinds are ideal for this purpose. There are different types of conservatory blinds and no Victorian conservatory is complete without blinds to either the roof or the panels. Conservatory blinds lessen the sun’s glare to a more mellow light and help to control the amount of heat that enters the conservatory. An added benefit of conservatory blinds is that they help to filter the sun’s harmful UV rays which ordinarily would fade your furnishings.

Traditional conservatory blinds have a wood weave, which combines shading and lightweight strength with attractive good looks. Pleated conservatory blinds are neat and modern and make an ideal choice for different styles and sizes of conservatory. If you want even more protection from the sun than the other types of conservatory blinds supply then you may want to consider Solar R conservatory blinds. Solar R is judged to be the highest performing conservatory blind material available as it reflects 85% of the sun’s energy. These conservatory blinds get rid of the glare, are easy to wipe clean and are light weight. If you are into gadgets and want something bang up to the minute then you may want to consider power pleat remote control conservatory blinds. The power pleat blinds allow you to open and close them against the sun with just a touch of a button. Power pleat blinds have their own small motor and you can choose exactly where you want them placed, they are convenient and easy to use.

Victorian Conservatories

An increasing number of magazines and home design programmes speak of bringing the outside into your home. One of the best ways of enjoying your garden all the year round, and bringing a touch of the outside into what might be a garden room, is by investing in a conservatory. A conservatory is a great addition to any home, whether you are looking for a home office, a garden room, dining room or just somewhere to sit with a drink after work. You should give plenty of consideration to the space you have available, the style of your property, and the amount of money you have to spend. If you live in an Edwardian or Victorian property, then a Victorian style conservatory is a great choice.

The Victorian conservatory tends to be more ornate than its Edwardian counterpart and the style can overwhelm some properties. Matched with a house of the same era, the Victorian conservatory is the ideal choice. The main style of the Victorian conservatory is based on the orangeries that were so popular among wealthy home owners during the seventeenth century. Once the Victorians discovered a more economical means of glass production, the conservatory grew in popularity and was wanted by everyone who could afford to have it.

Traditionally made of wood, the modern UPVC equivalent of the traditional Victorian conservatory can look just as good. Nowadays you are no longer restricted to plain white conservatories but have a choice of wood grain finishes such as mahogany and classic oak. An added bonus of the UPVC Victorian conservatory is that it is less likely to warp or rot than its historical wooden ancestor. Build styles may be a dwarf wall, a combination of glazing and brickwork, a fully glazed construction or a combination of glazing and raised panels.

Many people prefer to have a dwarf wall with their Victorian conservatory as plenty of light comes in through the multifaceted roof and front The front of a Victorian conservatory is similar to that of a bay window, giving you extra floor space and room for the family. You will need a roof vent in your conservatory to avoid overheating and the problem of condensation, roof vents can be either manual or electrical. French or patio doors are an ideal choice for the Victorian conservatory but you can choose to have a single door if that is what you prefer.

It is unfortunately the case that many older, Victorian and Edwardian properties are in areas where crime is on the increase. If you are worried about the security of your conservatory then choose a company that works with the Secured by Design programme. The Association of Chief Police Officers started the Secured by Design programme as a crime prevention project. Companies that have windows and doors that carry the ACPO seal use what is known as the Veka profile in their installations which makes them more secure and gives them a longer life, well worth looking at.

Victorian Back Hip

If you want to add value to your home then a conservatory is a sure fire winner providing you take care in assessing your available space and budget and getting something that is suitable for your property. If you live in a bungalow then you may have felt that it would be difficult to get the type of conservatory you want that will fit with a restricted height building. Conservatory companies have the answer to buildings of a restricted height and they can provide you with a back hip roof fitting and box gutter to compensate for the problem.

For those people who have a medium or large size garden the Victorian back hip conservatory is an ideal choice, this is a traditional Victorian style with a roof adjustment to allow for the reduced height of your home. Nowadays most conservatories are UPVC but if you live in a conservation area the planners may not allow a UPVC construction and you need to have a wooden conservatory. Although a hardwood conservatory may be a bit more expensive than the more usual UPVC, it will add considerably to the value of your property – which may make it easier if you decide to move any time in the future.

Nowadays most people have a conservatory because they want an extra room either to enjoy their garden all the year round or because they need a kid’s play space or a dining room – unlike the Victorians who generally used their structures for the cultivation of tropical fruits and plants they had brought back from abroad. The solid wood Victorian style conservatory will usually have a dwarf wall around the bottom. You can choose either mahogany or oak solid wood that is ethically produced from sustainable sources.

Because a Victorian back hip conservatory lets in so much light through its roof and multi-faceted front, that it is advisable to have conservatory blinds fitted for those days when you want the room to be a bit cooler. Opening windows allow for better ventilation along with a vent in the roof of the structure. You can choose single, French or patio doors for your conservatory and if you want something that is exceptionally energy efficient then you may want to consider the TriSeal window system which can increase energy efficiency by up to 15%.

If you choose an oak hardwood conservatory you can have the natural colour of the wood or you can have it stained darker if that fits better with your property. Solid wood flooring is the best choice for your conservatory as it is less likely to warp or rot than some other flooring materials. The beauty of a hardwood floor is that it has a warmer feel than either tiles or laminate and generally requires little maintenance. If you are not keen on solid wood floors then you have the option of terra cotta tiled flooring, which is easy to keep clean and fits in well, especially with a white painted or mahogany wood conservatory.,

Raked Lean To

Many people want conservatories because they know that it will add value to their property. If you are considering a conservatory but have limited outdoor space then a lean to or traditional conservatory may be the answer to your problem. Lean to or traditional conservatories come in different styles, the ordinary lean to is one, the raked lean to is another. A raked lean to is one with glazed, raked side frames that let in more light. When you choose this type of traditional conservatories, you also have a choice of three build types, a dwarf wall, full height glass and glass with raised panels. Which build type you choose is purely a matter of choice. If you go for full height glass you will have even more light in a raked traditional conservatory.

There is now much greater choice when it comes to UPVC conservatories and you no longer need to have the traditional colour of white, as you can also choose either a mahogany or classic oak finish. UPVC conservatories come with a ten year guarantee and are less susceptible to warp and rust than traditional wood, although you wouldn’t be able to have UPVC if you live in a conservation area – so that is the first thing to check out before you start making any other choices regarding your conservatory.

The type of flooring that you have in your conservatory deserves careful consideration. Hardwood flooring may seem expensive but it is cheaper in the long run, being more hardwearing, better looking, and needing less maintenance than laminated flooring. You should always buy your flooring from a company that uses responsibly sourced timber from sustainable supplies. There are three main types of conservatory doors that you can choose from and these are French doors, patio doors or a single door.

If you are concerned about warmth in your conservatory and conserving energy then pick windows that have a TriSeal Super Spacer Bar, which is a system using flexible foam technology which provides a longer lasting energy efficient solution for your windows. Windows have considerable impact on the energy efficiency of a building as a whole and the Triseal system ensures a longer life and the maintenance of your window’s insulating performance. The Triseal system is one of a number of systems that are being used to bring about an increase in efficiency of energy saving window design.

Nowadays people are worried about the security of their windows and doors, especially if they live in an area that is experiencing a high number of house break-ins. The Association of Chief Police Officers crime prevention project secured by design, awards their seal to those companies who use a design that ensures the security of a building and increases the life of the product. You should always choose a company that has the secured by design seal on its windows and doors as this will increase your security as the standard has to be one that is required by the ACPO/

Lean To Conservatories

There are many different types of conservatory to choose from and the lean to or traditional conservatory is very popular. The lean to conservatory is so called because the ridge of the building hugs into the outer wall of the house rather than extending from the property as with other styles. If you have limited space or you want to fill in a space between two protruding ends of a building, then a lean to conservatory is the ideal choice.

People often get bogged down in the style and colour of a conservatory even before they have thought about what kind of conservatory they actually have room for. The first thing you need to think about is what style of conservatory will fit into the space you have available. It’s no good discussing elements of an orangery if you only have room for a lean to conservatory.

Before you approach any suppliers you should have some understanding of what you want to use the conservatory for, you also need to consider where windows are sited and the pitch of your roof before you make any further choices. If you have limited space then a lean to or traditional conservatory is the best way to go. There are different build types for a lean to conservatory and many people choose a dwarf wall conservatory where there is a short wall and the rest is glass.

When you choose a lean to conservatory with a dwarf wall you can also have either manual or electric roof ventilation. A lean to conservatory may have a single door, French doors, or patio doors depending on your preference. You can have your conservatory in a choice of colours, classic oak, mahogany or white. UPVC conservatories are a popular choice because the material is hardwearing. If you live in a conservation area however you may not be able to have UPVC in which case a hardwood conservatory will be the best choice.

You will need to think about flooring in your conservatory and hardwood flooring that is ethically sourced is the best you can have. Wood flooring is much more durable than cheap laminates, requires little care and will last you for years. Whether you have a wooden traditionally styled conservatory or one made from UPVC, hardwood flooring installed by experts is still the best choice.

Choose a company that will offer you the secured by design seal, which is a crime prevention project run by the Association of Chief Police Officers. The scheme focuses on window and doors security. Conservatories with windows and doors that have the secured by design seal have products that are certified as of the standard required by the ACPO. Not only does such a design ensure the security of a building, it also increases the lifespan of the products and reduces any unnecessary maintenance work that might result from attempted break-ins. Choose windows that are fitted with a TriSeal Super Spacer bar, which uses flexible foam technology to provide and better and more lasting energy efficient solution.

Hip Roof Lean To

You don’t have to have a flat roof when you are considering a lean to conservatory; you can choose to have a hip roof style. A hip roof, sometimes referred to as a shed roof, is one that slopes down towards the front rather than lying flat. Many people choose a hip roof because it is often cheaper than a flat one. It is a good idea to find out whether there will be vents in the roof because hip roof buildings can become overheated in the summer months.

Nowadays there is a choice of colours when it comes to conservatories. You are no longer restricted to plain white UPVC conservatories, now you can choose a classic oak or mahogany finish as well. The lean to conservatory is often referred to as a traditional conservatory because it is the most common choice where people have limited space. There are three different build types for a lean to conservatory and it is a matter of personal preference whether you want full height glass in the building, raised panels and glass or one with a short wall and glass, what is known as a dwarf wall.

It is a good idea to check out whether UPVC conservatories are allowed in your area, if your neighbours have them then it’s probably ok. Some councils insist that conservatories should be made from wood because UPVC is not wanted in conservation areas or in areas where there are a lot of listed buildings. One of the best things about UPVC conservatories, apart from the fact that they are generally cheaper than those made from wood, is that they have less tendency to warp and rot than those built from other materials.

When you are shopping around for a hip roof traditional conservatory, look for a company that offers secured by design windows and doors. The secured by design programme is part of a crime prevention project operated by the Association of Chief Police Officers. Conservatory windows and doors that meet the standards of security set out by the association receive the secured by design seal. If you live in an area where burglary is the crime of choice, you will feel more protected when you look for conservatory windows and doors with the secured by design seal.

You need to decide whether you want a single door for your conservatory, French doors, or patio doors. An important element of a good conservatory is the flooring.
Always opt for solid wood flooring rather than cheap laminates, it may be a bit more expensive but you will save money in the long run. Solid wood floors tend to hold the heat better than cheaper alternatives and they are easy to take care of and will last for years. A conservatory is a major purchase that will add considerable value to your home so it is worth taking the time to consider what you really want from a conservatory, and whether it is affordable.

Gull Wing

A conservatory makes a great addition to any home, providing you with extra space to relax or a much needed dining room. While a conservatory may be seen as a considerable financial investment it will add value to your home and make it more saleable if you decide to move some time in the future. There are many different styles of conservatory available and the thing that you most need to bear in mind when choosing a conservatory is how much space you have available.

In a small to medium sized garden the traditional or lean to conservatory is often a favourite, there are several types to choose from and a number of build options. The Gull Wing conservatory is a variation on the lean to or traditional conservatory. Viewed from some angles the gull wing style appears rectangular; however, this type of conservatory is not just a series of right angles. Two corners of a gull wing conservatory face away from the building it is attached to, giving it a more interesting shape than the traditional lean to. If your home has a high wall along one side then you can choose to have just one shaped end. The gull wing conservatory is a title larger than the traditional lean to and is better in a medium sized garden.

The build options for a gull wing conservatory are the same as for a traditional lean to. You can choose a dwarf wall, glass with raised panels or all glass with a choice of single door, patio doors or French doors. With an all glass conservatory you need to decide whether you want your door in the centre, to the left or to the right hand side. If you are not keen on plain white conservatories then you can choose to have it in mahogany or classic oak. You will need roof ventilation in your conservatory and it is up to you whether you prefer an electric or a manual vent.

Flooring is an important part of any conservatory and many companies now recommend solid wood flooring because it lasts longer and is easier to maintain than laminate. Other than in conservation areas, most people choose UPVC conservatories, or unplasticised polyvinyl chloride. Additional strength is added to the roof and door frames with aluminium or steel, UPVC requires little maintenance other than cleaning and conservatories often come with a ten year guarantee.

UPVC is noted for its insulation properties and nowadays it is possible to increase the energy efficiency by having windows with the TriSeal Super Space Bar windows system. Using flexible foam technology, the system provides you with a long lasting energy efficient window system. While many modern window systems are made from steel, the great thing about the TriSeal is that it is a non-metal solution and not susceptible to rust. The system creates a barrier that keeps out steam and vapours, which in turn makes it condensation resistant. Most users report energy savings of up to 15% and a significant reduction in noise.

Edwardian Conservatories

In recent years Victorian and Edwardian properties have enjoyed a new lease of life as home buyers look for houses with original features built a hundred or more years ago. These, generally larger sized family homes often have medium to large size gardens, which means there is plenty of space for a conservatory. An Edwardian conservatory looks spectacular when attached to a property of the same vintage, although they suit modern properties and bungalows just as well.

If you have the space and want an Edwardian conservatory then you need to think about your budget and what you can afford before you look at the different options available. Most people have UPVC conservatories because they last for years and are often more cost effective than wooden conservatories. If you live close to a national park or in a conservation area then you need to consult your local planning office as to whether UPVC conservatories are allowed. Some councils will only allow conservatories that are not made from UPVC and there are areas where you may need planning permission for your conservatory. You should check these things out before you go any further with your plans for a conservatory.

The Edwardian conservatory is usually square or rectangular shaped and without the facets typical of the Victorian conservatory, the main benefit of this is that the shape maximises floor space. An Edwardian conservatory is distinguished by its pointed roof and come in different sizes from 2×2 metres to 6×6 metres. You can choose whether you want dwarf walls, raised panels and glass or all glass for the build design. Many Edwardian conservatories have French doors but you can have a single door or patio doors if you prefer. The all glass build type also has the option of where the door should be placed, to the left, to the right or in the centre. Many UPVC Edwardian conservatories have a white finish but you can choose to have your conservatory in a classic oak or mahogany finish.

While many people have laminate flooring in their conservatory, solid wood floors from ethically sourced timber are more durable and less likely to shrink or warp. Wooden floors may cost a bit more but they look better and last longer than other flooring options. You will need a vent in your conservatory roof and can choose between electric and manual options.

An increasing number of conservatory suppliers have signed up to the Association of Chief Police Officers’ crime prevention project, Secured by Design. Focused on the improvement and security in the design of windows and doors the project offers their ACPO Secured by Design seal to companies that use the Veka profile in their installations. If you live in an area where crime is on the increase then look for an Edwardian conservatory with the ACPO seal of approval , not only does this improve security it also means an increased lifespan of the product.

Edwardian Gable Front


UPVC conservatories, buildings made from unplasticised polyvinyl chloride are a cost effective way of adding extra value to your home. A conservatory is quite a sizable investment and so is worthy of considerable forethought and planning. It is always a good idea to be armed with basic information, including the area of space that you have available and whether your area has any planning restrictions. You should also undertake some research on what you can expect for your money and the different options available before you approach a particular company.

Whether or not you live in a period house, the Edwardian gable front conservatory is a very popular choice among conservatory buyers and can even be supplied with a back hip roof and box gutter if you live in a bungalow or other building of restricted height. One of the reasons that the Edwardian gable front design is so popular is because its high roof gives maximum head height and its shape gives more, and better use of floor space. The gable front is both stylish and spacious, which makes it the ideal choice for people with a medium or large size garden.

Most conservatories, including the Edwardian gable front conservatory can be modified to suit personal requirements. Choices of build style, doors and flooring make it much easier for you to have your conservatory designed with a particular room size in mind. You can choose ceiling to floor glazing but if you prefer some brickwork then you can have a dwarf wall with contrasting brickwork or brickwork closer to that of your property. The third build option is raised panels and glazing. You have a choice of colour finishes for your gable front conservatory from plain and practical white to classic oak and mahogany.

Like most other glass structures, conservatories can become overheated in the summer and to avoid any build-up of vapours you will need a roof vent and have the option of an electric or manual vent. There are various door styles that you can choose from, French doors look great with an Edwardian gable front, or you may prefer patio doors or even a single door. If you decide on a fully glazed build type you also have the option of where to place the door, to the right, to the left, or in the centre of the structure.

You should give consideration as to what type of flooring you would like in your conservatory. Some companies offer tiled or laminated flooring while others also offer real wood floors. The type of flooring you decide on will depend largely on how you intend to use the room. If you want a family room where you can sit in comfort and enjoy a drink after work then there is a lot to be said for solid wood flooring. There is nothing quite like real wood scattered with rugs to give a feeling of warmth and comfort. Make sure that the flooring is made from ethically sourced timber, which will not rot or warp and will last for years.

Edwardian Back Hip

If you live in a bungalow or other building of restricted height and are looking for a conservatory, then you will need to take these restrictions into consideration if you don’t want to make an expensive mistake. A conservatory is a major investment that will add lasting value to your home so it makes sense to get it right first time.

The Edwardian back hip conservatory is a variation on the traditional Edwardian conservatory that is designed especially for buildings of restricted height. If your building is of lower height because of its age and it is listed, then you will need to get planning permission for a conservatory. While most councils do not require that you have permission for a conservatory, it is a different matter when a listed building is concerned or if you happen to live in a conservation area.

The Edwardian style of conservatory is best suited to a medium or large size garden. Edwardian conservatories have a pointed roof and if you want to add one to your bungalow then the company should supply you with a back hip roof and box gutter. The Edwardian back hip conservatory is usually rectangular or square in shape and has a number of different build types of styles. You can have your conservatory with a dwarf or short wall and glass, raised panels and glass or all glass. When you choose an all glass style build you will need to decide whether you want the door positioned in the centre or to the right or left.

Most conservatories have venting systems in their roofs and you need to decide whether you want this to be manual or electric. Hip roofed conservatories may require some extra ventilation as they can over heat in the summer months. You should be able to chose the door style you want, either a single door, French doors or patio doors. UPVC conservatories are the most popular and cost effective conservatories and nowadays you can have your conservatory in three different colours, plain white, mahogany or classic oak.

Wooden flooring is more in keeping with an Edwardian style conservatory and is less likely to rot or warp compared to other types of flooring. Good companies will always be able to assure you that they use only ethically sourced timber in their flooring and may often have the seal of the forestry commission. If you are worried about security when you have your conservatory built, then it is a good idea to choose a company with the ACPO’s Secured by Design seal.

Secured by Design is a crime prevention project run by the Association of Chief Police Officers and is concerned with the secure design of home improvement products such as windows, doors and conservatories. Choose a conservatory with the Secured by Design seal and your home will be more secure and less accessible to house breakers, and the windows and doors on your Edwardian back hip conservatory will have a longer life.